Monthly Archives: November 2011

Cast a Cold Eye on Acceptance, on Rejection. Artist, Pass By!

Okay, forgive me.  I’ve “borrowed” and recast this title from the short poem that W.B. Yeats wrote for his tombstone:  “Cast a cold eye / On life, on death. / Horseman, pass by!”  You know, when you’ve been the greatest 20th-Century poet writing in English, there’s at least a decent chance that the epitaph you labored over will in fact be carved on your stone.  But even in a case like that (and Yeats did get his wish), there’s no guarantee.  And you might say that certain kinds of common and commonly-worthless guarantees (what you might call social signifiers of value) are my subject in this post.

Some of us were loved very little by our parents, some not at all.  Most of us weren’t loved by them nearly enough to satisfy our needy childhood hearts.  What’s more, most of us never fully wake up to that painful truth, because the things that it seems to imply about our worth, our ability to inspire love, and our chance of surviving are unbearable to us.

But the degree to which we won’t wake up to that gnawing reality will be the degree to which we go on “looking for love [and satisfaction] in all the wrong places.”  Most of us, in self-defeating self-protection, project our futile desires and delusions onto the world around us.  We want the approval of anyone who looks like a parental figure and we want to be vindicated in our projected delusion that we can trust them, that they care about us, that we can replicate our family home in our marriages or in our work or in our social group, but that this time we’ll have a happy ending.  We’ll get what we want and what we really deserve.

And even though cynicism has grown from the revelations of scandalous misconduct everywhere from Wall Street and the Oval Office to the Vatican and the ministry of Jim and Tammy Fae Bakker, we continue, on the whole, to expect the holders of high office to be well-informed, worthy of their positions, and concerned about us and the general well-being.  We expect experts to be expert and professionals to be professional.  In our realm of photography and the other arts, most of us expect that prizewinners deserved their prizes, that prominent curators and gallerists know great art (and awful art) when they see it.  We have to get over these assumptions.  Yes, sometimes such people have indeed earned their honors and merited their good reputations.  But only sometimes.

Though it places a greater grief and responsibility on us than we may want to shoulder, we have to do our independent best to look beyond the medals and titles to what lies behind them.  I always feel a combination of rueful amusement and sadness when I hear a fellow artist puzzling in dismay over why some artist who appears to be meritless, even ridiculous, has been given a famous award or had one of his works sold for an absurdly grand sum of money.  Hey, really, why, for instance, would Christie’s or Sotheby’s take out a full-page ad in the New York Times to show us the ceramic sculpture of Michael Jackson and Bubbles the Chimp, produced by the Jeff Koons factory, on which the distinguished auction house placed an estimated selling price of $10-15 million dollars?

I have two things to tell you, for your benefit (I hope), from my fairly wide-ranging experience with different fields and with people at different “levels” within those fields:  in academia, government, business, law, poetry and photography; with FBI agents, prize- winning authors, governors, and Teamsters.

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