Category Archives: Society and Politics

Windows and Doors and Waves and the Well

“The Window Is at Your Feet” by Lawrence Russ

“[The] notion that man has a body distinct from his soul is to be expunged; this I shall do, by printing in the infernal method, by corrosives, which in Hell are salutary and medicinal, melting apparent surfaces away, and displaying the infinite which was hid.

“If the doors of perception were cleansed every thing would appear to man as it is, Infinite.

“For man has closed himself up, till he sees all things thro’ narrow chinks of his cavern.”

                              — William Blake, from The Marriage of Heaven and Hell

 

“Playground at the Edge of the Sea, past Sunset” by Lawrence Russ

Children in a playground at the edge of the vast and bountiful and mysterious and increasingly-dangerous sea (“increasingly” thanks to our stupidly-heedless “play”) — with glory stretching away, above and beyond.  Given, in part, what is happening these days, and what we should expect in the year to come, I decided to put a print of this image on my workday office wall.

Recommendations in this context:  Reread Moby Dick — skip the whaling-industry stuff, if you like — and watch Peter Wier’s The Last Wave.  As profound and prophetic and poetic as you could want!

And here is a pertinent poem by the great, late (d. 1994) Norwegian poet, Rolf Jacobsen, translated by Robert Bly:

    Sssh

Sssh the sea says
Sssh the small waves at the shore say, sssh
Not so violent, not
So haughty, not
So remarkable,
Sssh
Say the tips of the waves
Crowding around the headland’s
Surf. Sssh
They say to people
This is our earth
Our eternity.

And, lastly, and particularly with Christmas in mind, a short poem of mine:

        THIRST

Believe it
or not, the well
is here.

But you must fall a long way
to reach
that water.

And from there,
someone else
must draw you up.

“Come to Me (St. Thomas Cemetery, Stratford, CT)” by Lawrence Russ

I love to quote this from Tiny Tim, on many occasions, but none better than on Christmas:

“God bless us every one.”

 

 

 

 

Suspicious Minds: My Farewell and Regrets, for President Obama

With President Obama’s imminent departure from office in mind, I thought of a photograph that I’d taken back in 2003, before I’d ever heard the name “Barack”:  “Mr. Lincoln’s Sympathy Viewed with Suspicion.”  If I’ve ever captured what Cartier-Bresson called a “decisive moment” (when “one’s head, one’s eye, and one’s heart [join] on the same axis”), this is evidence of it. 

I was sitting on a bench in the Town Square of Stamford, Connecticut, waiting to see what the world would bring my way.  Across from where I sat was the statue of Abraham Lincoln that you see in my photograph.  Abe sits, leaning forward, forearms on his thighs, head tilted downward, thoughtful, maybe melancholy.

Slowly, another critical element came into view, crossing the square toward the statue:  a heavy older woman with frizzy white hair glowing, backlit by the summer sun.  She wore a tight, hot-pink T-shirt with a picture of Minnie Mouse dressed as Carmen Miranda.  She lowered herself carefully onto the front of the concrete slab that supported the Great Emancipator.  Then she set down beside her a couple of plastic bags and a cup of Chock Full o’ Nuts coffee.  Certainly, this, too, was an American presence.

She looked around suspiciously, squinting at passersby with a wary disapproval.  And I started to think, “Oh, please, please, please, let her look at Abe’s face in just that way!”  I began, as covertly as I could, taking photographs of her and the statue — wishing and hoping all the while.  At the twelfth exposure, not only did the moment I prayed for arrive, but something else, entirely unforeseen and felicitous, had happened in the meantime.  Four pigeons had settled on the corners of the concrete plateau, surrounding Lincoln and his sour companion.  So, at the moment when I got the desired image, it also featured those avian sentinels, witnesses to the less-than-happy encounter. 

mr-lincolns-sympathy-viewed-with-suspicion

“Mr. Lincoln’s Sympathy Viewed with Suspicion” by Lawrence Russ

(For a better view of this photograph, see my website at:  http://www.lawrenceruss.com/index/C0000HrILmRgUq4A/G00004_tcloQpRik/I00006jzaFm0FQaw

I voted for Barack Obama in two presidential elections.  In my hopefulness, I’d been struck by his admiration for Lincoln, and by my sense, a sense shared by many other people, that Obama, too, had uncommon intelligence and uncommon concern for his fellow humans.  In the end, I think that most of us who supported him are disappointed that his Presidency didn’t come to more.  Yes, some of us think that he should have realized sooner what intransigent selfishness and malice he faced from Republicans, and that he should have confronted them with the central issues of “economic inequality” more directly and forcefully.  But we can’t justly blame him for the ruthlessness and heedlessness of his opposition.  Sitting on the sidelines, we can’t know if and how he might have accomplished more of what we wanted.  And we can’t know the pain, frustration, and sorrowing disbelief that he must have suffered while trying to swim against a terribly cold and unrelenting tide.

What I do believe is this:  that part of what thwarted Mr. Obama as President, in addition to the racism, the unconscionable greed, and the lust for partisan power, was that so many people are blind to honest virtue when they see it.  They’ve strayed so far from it, and society and its media have cast it in such a disdainful and worldly light that when people meet earnest good will, they frequently view it as weakness, simple-mindedness, or deceitful posturing.  Too many people just could not believe, given his seeming difference from them, that Obama did not wish to cause them harm.  Suspicion and projected selfishness faced our all-too-soon-to-be-former President whenever he came to the public square.