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The Body, Mortal and Immortal, as a Camera

 

“You Want to Take MY Picture?” by Lawrence Russ

Yes, the word “camera” is italicized in the original text of this passage from “The God of the Living” by George MacDonald. The word opens an entrance into these thoughts as a revelation of what photography, at least great photography, in its essential, not its merely “definitional” nature, is and aims and serves to do. Those with ears to hear, eyes to see, will understand:

“Let us first ask what is the use of this body of ours. It is the means of Revelation to us, the camera in which God’s eternal shows are set forth. It is by the body that we come into contact with Nature, with our fellow men, with all their revelations of God to us. It is through the body that we receive all the lessons of passion, of suffering, of love, of beauty, of science. It is through the body that we are both trained outwards from ourselves, and driven inwards into our deepest selves to find God. There is glory and might in this vital evanescence, this slow glacier-like flow of clothing and revealing matter, this ever uptossed rainbow of tangible humanity. It is no less of God’s making than the spirit that is clothed therein.

“We cannot yet have learned all that we are meant to learn through the body. How much of the teaching even of this world can the most diligent and most favoured man have exhausted before he is called to leave it! Is all that remains to be lost? Who that has loved this earth can but believe that the spiritual body of which St. Paul speaks will be yet a higher channel of such revelation? The meek who have found that their Lord spake true, and have indeed inherited the earth, who have seen that all matter is radiant of spiritual meaning, who would not cast a sigh for the loss of mere animal pleasure, would, I think, be the least willing to be without a body, to be unclothed without being again clothed upon. Who, after centuries of glory in heaven, would not rejoice to behold once more that patient-headed child of winter, the meek snowdrop? In whom, amidst the golden choirs, would not the vision of an old sunset wake such a song as the ancient dwellers of the earth would with gently flattened palm hush their throbbing hearts to hear?

“The Wand” by Lawrence Russ

“All this revelation, however, would render only a body necessary, not this body. The fulness of the word Resurrection would be ill met if this were all. We need not only a body to convey revelation to us, but a body to reveal us to others. The thoughts, feelings, imaginations that arise in us, must have their garments of revelation whereby shall be made manifest the unseen world within us to our brothers and sisters around us; else is each left in human loneliness. Now, if this be one of the uses my body served on earth before, the new body must be like the old. Nay, it must be the same body, glorified as we are glorified, with all that was distinctive of each from his fellows more visible than ever before. The accidental, the nonessential, the unrevealing, the incomplete will have vanished. That which made the body what it was in the eyes of those who loved us will be tenfold there. Will not this be the resurrection of the body? of the same body though not of the same dead matter? Every eye shall see the beloved, every heart will cry ‘My own again! – more mine because more himself than ever I beheld him!’ For do we not say on earth, ‘He is not himself today,’ or ‘She looks her own self;’ ‘She is more like herself than I have seen her long?’ And is not this when the heart is glad and the face is radiant? For we carry a better likeness of our friends in our hearts than their countenances, save at precious seasons, manifest to us.”

 

“Who Is Your Master?” by Lawrence Russ

Windows and Doors and Waves and the Well

“The Window Is at Your Feet” by Lawrence Russ

“[The] notion that man has a body distinct from his soul is to be expunged; this I shall do, by printing in the infernal method, by corrosives, which in Hell are salutary and medicinal, melting apparent surfaces away, and displaying the infinite which was hid.

“If the doors of perception were cleansed every thing would appear to man as it is, Infinite.

“For man has closed himself up, till he sees all things thro’ narrow chinks of his cavern.”

                              — William Blake, from The Marriage of Heaven and Hell

 

“Playground at the Edge of the Sea, past Sunset” by Lawrence Russ

Children in a playground at the edge of the vast and bountiful and mysterious and increasingly-dangerous sea (“increasingly” thanks to our stupidly-heedless “play”) — with glory stretching away, above and beyond.  Given, in part, what is happening these days, and what we should expect in the year to come, I decided to put a print of this image on my workday office wall.

Recommendations in this context:  Reread Moby Dick — skip the whaling-industry stuff, if you like — and watch Peter Wier’s The Last Wave.  As profound and prophetic and poetic as you could want!

And here is a pertinent poem by the great, late (d. 1994) Norwegian poet, Rolf Jacobsen, translated by Robert Bly:

    Sssh

Sssh the sea says
Sssh the small waves at the shore say, sssh
Not so violent, not
So haughty, not
So remarkable,
Sssh
Say the tips of the waves
Crowding around the headland’s
Surf. Sssh
They say to people
This is our earth
Our eternity.

And, lastly, and particularly with Christmas in mind, a short poem of mine:

        THIRST

Believe it
or not, the well
is here.

But you must fall a long way
to reach
that water.

And from there,
someone else
must draw you up.

“Come to Me (St. Thomas Cemetery, Stratford, CT)” by Lawrence Russ

I love to quote this from Tiny Tim on many occasions, but never more than on Christmas:

“God bless us every one.”

 

 

 

 

Who Really Made That Photograph? – Part 2 of 2

I drove by the site late one day and took a few photos for my final-stretch planning.  After dinner, when I looked at the photos on my computer, I did a troubled double-take.  In the few days since I got the property owner’s consent, the very tree whose “pose” I intended my wife to imitate had disappeared.

2016_11_25-fairfield-old-field-road-fisty-trees-_f9a2777

Perhaps the owner had thought that the trunk was so close to breaking that it would be a hazard for us.  In fact, on the day of the shoot, as I was setting up, he came out to talk for a couple of minutes and warned me that the trees were not in sound shape and might have to be taken down, so we should be careful.

I have to say that my experience, and my trust in God’s will and the gifts of the Tao, give me decent equanimity about such turns, knowing that however they first appear, they can lead to something better than what I’d planned.  As I believe this one did.

I got the idea that I might also try having my wife kneel in an attitude of prayer or supplication for the photos.  After all, those were not exactly friendly-looking trees in that yard.  Part of my sense of the desired image had to do with the brutish look of those trees, and the brutish nature of our world, which in turn made me think of Moses’ statement that during his exile in the land of Midian he had been “a stranger in a strange land.”  It struck me, looking at the remaining trees, that a kneeling posture would more closely mirror their verticality.

The Unforeseen apparently took this as an invitation to make still further improvements on my scheme.  Not only had I not planned on the alternate pose for my model, but I didn’t anticipate that when we tried the kneeling poses, a wind would rise to blow her hair sideways and to make her move her head and hands a bit during a few exposures, so that.  Seeing them later, I would feel that those effects had given my wife’s appearance an added sense of urgency or distress, which I believed was affecting.

I also didn’t plan or foresee that during the kneeling shots that I liked best (with my wife’s palms turned pleadingly upward and the wind blowing her hair), an intensely-red sky would appear behind her.  Without the emotional and visual force of that sky, my “final” image would not be nearly as compelling as I hope that it is.  Here’s the photograph, “In the Land of Strangers” (please view it at larger size and better visual quality on my website, by using the following link  –  it’s Image # 6 of the “Marion under the Moon” portfolio within the “Fires in the Night” collection):  

http://www.lawrenceruss.com/index/C0000nyIYjBmXbWE/G0000YbrlfdMLgx0/I0000j8_XLqCjgho ) :

in-the-land-of-strangers-lawrence-russ

But there was a still-deeper element to the work of Mystery in making this picture.

While we were engaged in the shoot, I wasn’t consciously thinking about the fact, and my wife did not know, that about three weeks before that I was given news that caused a crisis in my life.  I didn’t want her to have to suffer while awaiting its outcome, so I kept it from her in the meantime.  In such a time, under other circumstances, I would have wanted her to pray for me.

Two days after our photo session, I was able to tell her what had been happening, and that there was no longer anything to worry about.

The next night, as I was intensely engaged in editing the new “Marion” photograph, I realized that by having her adopt the pose that I had, and having shaped the image as I had, I had essentially drawn her into praying for me without her having to know about it or the reasons for it – except insofar as she might have prayed for the success of the photographer’s present, complicated efforts.

And when I consider who and what gave birth to this photograph, I have to remember that part of my idea for “Marion under the Moon” is that each photograph in it should in some way reflect another aspect of my wonderful model-wife.  If she were not as loving and caring, as spiritually profound as she is, would I have made this photograph as it now stands?  Would I have thought to put her in the pose that I did?  Was I unconsciously or half-consciously calling on her prayerful strength without having to disclose my troubles to her?  If none of that had been the case, if she were other than she is, if she were a lesser or different kind of inspiration to me than she is, could I have made this photograph?  I don’t believe so.

And did her posed prayerfulness contribute to the happy conclusion to my trial?  How can I know?  We live among mysteries.  And sometimes we receive help, with our photography and more, without asking for it or even being aware of it.  There are more things and allies in heaven and earth and art, in anything that “we” achieve, than are dreamt of in our philosophy or vanity, Horatio.